• Day #236/365: The Owl Service: fashion plates and (another) peek behind the curtain

    File under: Trails and Influences. Other Pathways. Case #38/52.

    I think I’ve mentioned before that I have something of a soft spot for press release for cultural releases from previous years. I’m not completely sure why but I think it’s in part the sense of seeing/discovering something which was once only seen by/intended for a very limited, behind the scenes audience; coming across them feels like quietly discovering a touch of cultural buried treasure or maybe pulling aside the curtain to reveal Oz working the levers and machinery that power his phantasmic stories/apparitions.

    Along such lines, below are the Granada Television press sheets for the colour transmission of The Owl Service:

    The Owl Service - Granada Press Release (1978) 1-Alan Garner-A Year In The CountryThe Owl Service - Granada Press Release (1978) 2-Alan Garner-A Year In The CountryThe Owl Service - 3-Alan Garner-A Year In The CountryThe Owl Service - Press Release 4-Alan Garner-A Year In The Country

    Although black and white television sets could still be found around and about for a decade or two or more after the aforementioned colour transmission, it still feels like a curiously distant and far away time when such things were a consideration…

    Two of my favourite lines for the press releases are these:

    “One essential point in its favour is that it will hold adults as firmly in its Welsh hobgoblin grip as the children.”

    “The world of the book is wholly adult. Only the language, the angle of vision, belong to childhood.”

    …which rather nicely sum up the curiously adult/cross-generational aspects and themes of the series or to quote Mr Ben Wheatley at Day #136/365 around these parts:

    “The Owl Service… it’s like David Lynch… I watched it about five or six years ago, and I was just stunned by it. You wouldn’t even fathom showing that to children now. That’s what would pass as adult drama now, even quite difficult adult drama…”

    And while I’m on the topic of such semi-lost cultural documentation, although probably quite normal promotional activity at the time, the article below is slightly head-shakingly curious considering the otherly significance/signifying that the series has/has gained over the years.

    The Owl Service-Alan Garner-television series-A Year In The CountryThe Owl Service-Alan Garner-television series-A Year In The Country-2

    There’s nothing like some “cosy country-wise winter fashion” to accompany mythological tales of tackling the wolf in every mind (!); “Outdoor life is great when you’re dressed for the job in hand”.

    Other related artifacts around these parts here and here. Remnants of transmissions before the flood here.

    Previous glimpse-behind-the-curtain documentation: a selection of artifacts from a boy who fell to earth.

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  • Day #235/365: Omega; a prescient semi-lost celluloid pathway…

    Donald Fox-Omega-From Above-Death and Vanilla-The Great Pop Supplement-A Year In The Country-collage-higher contrast-screen size
    Trails and Influences: Electronic Ether. Case #32/52.

    Some things in culture seem to presage future works and to be connected with previous ones, even if there are little or no obvious connections between their possible brethren, antecedents and descendants (see Day #149/365).

    Donald Fox’s Omega is one of such cultural items.

    It is a short, experimental film from 1970. I know little about it, I’m not sure I want to, I preferred it when I knew almost nothing and I could just soak in the film and consider/reflect on it without outside input.

    So with that and before you should read any further, if you should wish to step aside from here and view the film, do so here.

    Cultural connections? Well, it reminds me of Kenneth Anger’s pre-pop video pop videos, the final Quatermass series, the artistic eyes of Phase IV and Beyond The Black Rainbow, Chris Markers fellow experimental but accessible science fiction orientated La Jetée, a whole slew of hauntological minded artwork/otherly geometries, in particular Julian House’s videos for the Broadcast and The Focus Group Witchcults album…

    The little I know: nothing about Donald Fox beyond apparently his whereabouts is not widely known. The film is available in a very limited manner in a commercial/educational release and also has been frozen in a low fidelity quality via modern recording amber.

    When I first watched Omega I thought it was about the end of the earth, albeit in a rather pleasingly curiously modern seeming colourful and sort of psychedelic manner. A brief peruse tells me that it is actually about firing an energy beam at the sun which then enables mankind to  escape their earthly bodies and roam the universe.

    Death and Vanilla-From Above-A Year In The CountryI first came across the film via Death and Vanilla, whose work I have been exploring; they had used an edited version of it to accompany their From Above song. The film looks custom-made for the song, matching it’s aesthetics seamlessly.

    (I was thinking how to describe Death and Vanilla’s work; I came across it via Broadcast and it seems to share some similar starting points, intentions and aesthetics. Which would be? Well, if pushed to describe such things I would possibly arrive at a genre description a touch too long to easily fit on the descriptive separators in bricks and mortar record shops… something along the lines of retro modernist psychedelic exploratory futurist electronic pop).

    View Omega here. View From Above / Omega here. View Death and Vanilla here and the still corporeal but nolonger so accessible version of From Above here.

     

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  • Day #234/365: Scherenschnitte: nocturnal strigiformes, fields in England & otherly folkloric tales and signifiers via patience and a neatness of hand…

    Amy Flurry-Nikki Salk-Paper-Cut-Project-A Year In The Country-2File under: Trails and Influences: Recent Explorations. Case #29/52.

    I tend to find myself somewhat drawn to paper cut work/artwork/scherenschnitte. I’m not quite sure why. Maybe it’s the level of dedication, patience and well, neatness that it seems to require.

    It can be very pretty in a decorative, craft orientated manner, which is all good and fine but occasionally I’ll come across work that seems to step over and towards somewhere else, nearer to art I suppose and somewhere a little more otherly if you like.

    Recently I was a-browsing in one of the few remaining bookshops that exist in bricks and mortar form (one with a doorway that you can step over the threshold of in a corporeal rather than a stream of zeros and ones manner, something of a rarity today) and I came across the book Paper Cutting…

    …which lead me to the work below…

    Talking of corporeality, below is the work of Elsa Mora… there is a visceral, unsettling quality to her work that brings to mind Frida Kahlo or the harsher origin tellings of fairy tales and took me to thoughts of what became known as lowbrow art via the pages of Juxtapoz magazine and the like…

    Elsa Mora-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country 2 Elsa Mora-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country 4
    Elsa Mora-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country-7
    Elsa Mora-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country-6Elsa Mora-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country 3
    Elsa Mora-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country

    …and then onto the work of Emma Van Leest, who has a nice take on project titles (which put me in mind of Virginia Astley’s From Gardens Where We Feel Secure and it’s quietly unsettling take on corners of the land which will forever be England – A barn for a goddess and other talesVillage MurmursA homage to a private placeWayfaringThe dowsed heartTo dream in waking lifeBefore the first rainAs to a nestBucolica)…

    …or indeed a touch of a certain field in England to the first piece of work below…

    Emma Van Leest-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country-Come-by-chance

     

    Emma Van Leest-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country-dowsed heartEmma Van Leest-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country

    …with the amount of work that needs to be invested in paper cut work and it’s often irreproducibility, it’s not a huge surprise to see such things in the fine art corner of the cultural world… and so when I went a-wandering, I came across Emma Flurry and Nikki Salk’s Paper-Cut-Project in such places and positionings…

    Amy Flurry-Nikki Salk-Paper-Cut-Project-A Year In The Country-1 Amy Flurry-Nikki Salk-Paper-Cut-Project-A Year In The Country-2
    …and I was also drawn to the above two items through a longstanding interest and attraction in otherly pastoralism/folklore to the myths, tales and signifiers of nocturnal strigiformes and the like…

    …and also quite possibly the parades and maskery of a certain flickering, semi-demi-lost piece of celluloid

    Cindy Ferguson-Paper Cutting-A Year In The Country.jpg
    …and I think it would be rude to leave such things without wandering by and under the exotic pylons and (sometimes) bad wires of an electric eden courtesy of Cindy Ferguson.

    A recent starting point:
    Papercutting book-Laura Heyengs-Rob Ryan-Natalie Avelia-A Year In The Country

    Somewhere else to wander.

    …and here and here.

     

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  • Day #233/365: Image P/3

    Image P3-A Year In The Country
    File under:
    A Year In The Country: Work

     

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  • Day #232/365: Image O/3

    Image O3-A Year In The Country
    File under:
    A Year In The Country: Work

     

    View more visual work from the A Year In The Country project in the Gallery.

     

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  • Day #231/365: Artifact #33/52 released; Holt Reverence archival print

    Holt Reverence archival print. £10.00
    Artifact 33-print-A Year In The CountryArtifact 33-signature-A Year In The Country Artifact 33-numbering-A Year In The CountryArtifact 33-stamp-A Year In The CountryArtifact 33-image-A Year In The Country

    Limited edition of 52. Each print is signed and numbered.
    Handstamped on the reverse.

    Size: A4; 29.7 x 21cm / 11.7 x 8.3″ (including 2cm/0.8″ border).
    Printed with archival Giclée pigment inks on fine art 310gsm textured 100% cotton rag paper.

    Free UK shipping.

    Available at our Artifacts Shop.

     

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  • Day #230/365: “Beyond the last places, the blanks on the map”; signposts to and from a deserted village

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-13
    Trails and Influences: Electronic Ether. Case #31/52.

    newlyborn

    This is a sublime, haunting, moving piece of work.

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-12

    I’ve just rewatched it and I feel slightly stunned. Sometimes you come across something that leaves you stunned and with words failing you. This is one of those times. I feel like I need to stop, step back and go and wander for a while, let what I’ve just seen and heard settle in my mind…

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-11

    It reminds me of General Orders No. 9 in some ways (see Day #51/365), in that its a poetic visual take on the land and its stories. Something that feels as though it has many layers to it, not all of which will be easily unearthed or known.

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-9

    To a subtle, minimal soundtrack a voice narrates as the film journeys across the land, water and through the fields. I don’t want to go into the story that it tells overly here, I think that should be left for the work itself…

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-8

    …signposts to and from: a few years ago I came across some limited edition music releases that had been sent out into the world by Deserted Village and their work, world and travelling companions had intrigued me and kept playing around the corners of my mind…

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-10

    …but I would tend not to know quite where to (re)start, the Deserted Village was a place with many visitors and which has sent forth many recordings…

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-6

    …the writer and director of newlyborn is Dave Colohan, who is one of the co-founders of the Deserted Village label and the experimental folk(?)lorists United Bible Studies…

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-7

    …and so this film became a (second) starting point. A signal and signpost to and from Deserted Village, United Bible Studies, the solo/collaborative work of Dave Colohan and Richard Moult…

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-5

    So, with much more wandering still to do, here are but a few pathways which I have followed…

    Deserted Village. Recordings in the small hours and during gale force windsFor Fran, Etched In Glass & Water. The Shore That Fears The Sea.

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-4

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-3

    newlyborn-Dave Colohan-United Bible Studies-Deserted Village-A Year In The Country-2
    newlyborn.

     

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  • Day #229/365: A Bear’s Ghosts…

    File under: Trails and Influences: Recent Explorations. Case #28/52.

    I recently wandered amongst former structures of/connected to conflict which were now being recovered by nature and/or in part semi-forgotten (see Day #228/365)… which lead me indirectly to the below images.

    They are part of a series/book project by Jan Kempenaers called Spomenik; the structures themselves were created behind the once Iron Curtain as memorials. Now apparently they are largely abandoned.

    There is a (brutalist) beauty and fascination to them, they seem to have tumbled from both the future and the past; despite the all too real history which inspired them, they now seem almost like impossible fictions or props from a filmic story.

    In a way they remind me of Charles Frégers photographs of folkloric ritual costumes (see Day #69/365), in that they seem to be a version of something which has been taken to an almost unreal or surreal other/further degree.

    Beyond that I think I shall let them speak for themselves…

    Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-5 (2)

    Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country (2) Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country (3) Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country (4) Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country (5) Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country (6) Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-3 Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-4  Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-5 Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-6 Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-7 Jan Kempenaers-Spomenik-A Year In The Country-8

     

     

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  • Day #228/365: Studys and documentation of the fading shadows from defences of the realm…

    File under: Trails and Influences. Other Pathways. Case #37/52.

    I’ve mentioned this before but I seemed to spend a good part of my younger years fascinated by small-scale defence installations; concrete pillboxes that stood in fields, resisting the passage of time, debris filled air raid shelters and the like…

    These were part of what appears to be/have been a vest network of semi-invisible defences scattered across the landscape, on cliff edges and beneath our feet.

    Over the years there has come to be a growing body of literature that documents and investigates such buildings and their associated preparedness; the eyes, ears and quiet claws that were intended to defend the realm.

    Here are but a few of such things…

    The Royal Observer Corps-Underground Monitoring Posts-Subterrania Britannica-A Year In The CountryOne of my favourites (if that’s the right phrase to use in such a case). The Royal Observer Corps Underground Monitoring Post were a series of around 1500 such two-man installations… there is something both heroic and tragically hopeful about them. The small hand cranked air raid siren on this cover both fascinates and gives me the heebie jeebies.                                              
    Cold War-Building For-English Heritage-Subterrania Britannica-A Year In The CountrySomething of a magnificent structure (well, if you overlook its purpose)… All the energy, resources etc that went into all this kind of boggles the mind…
    Burlington-Nick Catford-Subterranea Britannica-A Year In The CountrySubterranean Britain-Cold War Bunkers-Nick Catford-Subterrania Britannica-A Year In The Country
    Ghost Fields Of Suffolk-Roderick McKenzie-A Year In The Country Ghost Fields Of Norfolk-Roderick McKenzieGhost Fields Of… is such a wonderfully evocative title, a fine piece of accidental hauntological naming… and the fact that there is a pairing of such books seems to help quietly confuse and fascinate my mind.
    British Anti-Invasion Defences-A Pocket Reference Guide-Pillbox Study Group-A Year In The CountryAnd while I’m talking of accidental hauntological namings… The Pillbox Study Group sounds as though it is something I should’ve stumbled upon via The Belbury Parish Magazine.”Cold War dread” is a phrase that I have often come across while studying, researching and wandering amongst what has come to be labelled hauntological culture and is something that seems to often be associated with those of a certain age and who grew up in a particular era when the possibility of such conflagrations was potentially all too real…

    That sense of dread and its sources aren’t something that I often overtly refer to during A Year In The Country but I think in many ways it constantly underpins and informs much of these otherly wanderings.

    Now it is almost as though it has become in part merely a possibly over referred to cultural aesthetic/signifier but though the “hot” characteristics of such cold conflicts does not currently seem to abound, it would seem that all the associated machinery is still posted around the world, still pointed somewhere but I’m not sure quite where or what for.

    ‘Twould seem you can keep the genies in the bottles (fortunately and much praise for that) but not have them dissolve away, even when it is claimed that there wishes are nolonger required.

    Hmmm.

    Henry Wills-Pillboxes-A Study Of UK Defences-A Year In The CountryMike Osborne-Pillboxes Of Britain and Ireland-Subterrania Britannica-A Year In The Country…and while I’m mentioning such things, above are two more explorations of these stoic guardians…
    Fortress Kent-The Guardian Of England-A Year In The Country…and talking of guardians… this brings to mind both defence and attackers from elsewhere, the wording reminds me of long sleeping protectors from The Changes, the installations themselves could be The Tripods marching across the land…
     Defending Britain-Mike Osborne-A Year In The CountryDefending Anglesey-Mark Dalton-A Year In The Country
    …and more investigative studies of such forgotten and not currently thought needed structures… I find a strange kind of beauty in the one on the above right. I’m not quite sure why. There’s an optimism, a loneliness and a joy to it in some way…
    A Year In The Country-hauntological diagram
    The above image is from one of these investigations; it seems like album clipart just waiting to be sent out into the world….

    I feel that I should use the phrase England My Lionheart somewhere on this page. I’m not quite sure why. Not in a jingoistic little England manner. More I think because it is a song/phrase that conjures a very particular yearning, loss and hope, which is something that architecture such as the above can also at times seem to…

    So with that, as the soldiers soften, the war ends and the air-raid shelters bloom over, I shall depart these fields of zeros and ones for a moment or two…

    Thankyou to Subterrania Britannica.

    Step under the ivy: An English Lionheart.

    Previous installations and ghosts.

     

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  • Day #227/365: Image N/3

    Image N3-A Year In The Country
    File under:
    A Year In The Country: Work

    View more visual work from the A Year In The Country project in the Gallery.

     

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  • Day #226/365: Traces From A Delerium Of Forests…

    Trails and Influences: Electronic Ether. Case #30/52.

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-Folkore Tapes-David Chatton Barker-Samandthplants-Rob St John-A Year In The CountryAnd talking of stumbling upon things just after they have occurred (see Day #221/365).

    For a fair while now the exhibition “Time, the deer, is in the wood of Hallaig”, curated and collected by Amy Cutler has picked away at my mind and memory…

    I didn’t see it in person, so now I find myself trying to piece together the atmosphere and stories of the exhibition from the traces that it has left behind in the ether.

    And there are many traces but that is all that they are, traces, wisps, fragments of the specimens that were one brought together and contained. Through a mass of recording, copying, replicating much of culture may have become largely atemporal but there are still some things which resist such easy documentation…

    Wandering through this particular forest I tend to start at this quote:

    “A candle-lit collection on forests, memory, and social and natural history. Cabinets of book works, wood works, bark pieces, specimens, prints, film, and music / Tree ring slices and photographs from Kew’s museum of Economic Botany, English Heritage and the London Metropoloitan Archives / Installations and one-off editions from forty artists, including Richard Skelton, herman de vries, Katsutoshi, Yuasa, Colin Sackett, Chris Drury, Una Hamilton Helle and Byran Nash Gill.”

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-Folkore Tapes-David Chatton Barker-Samandthplants-Rob St John-A Year In The Country-2

    ….then wander into considering that the opening night had audio-visual by David Chatton-Barker of Folklore Tapes (see Day #7/365) and Samandtheplants (both also from Echo of Light, see Day #32/365) and Rob St John (also Folklore Tapes and Water Of Life)…

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-Wolf Notes-A Year In The Country 2

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-A Year In The Country 3But as I wander through its pathways and push at the bracken, it seems to grow, boxes open and books unfurl, the exhibitors, performers and elements branching, the names Forest Memory and Nostalgia Forest wander into view, alongside Algonquin and bitten bark piece, In Memory Of The Scottish Forests, Dendrochronology photographs, The Forest Writes Itself, Ancient Order of Foresters Sashes, The Grief Of Trees, Photographs of submerged forests, The Dark Would…

    It intrigues and scatters my mind and the more I read about it, the more it tumbles away…

    A mystery that time holds away from me.

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-A Year In The Country 5

    Other pathways through this particular woodland:

    Wandering players:
    David Chatton-Barker (who also put together the poster… fine piece of folkloric iconography in the title).
    Samandtheplants (and Natural/Supernatural Lancashire at Day #97/365).
    Rob St John / Water Of Life.

    The many branches of the exhibition catalogue.

    Write Off The Map: Amy Cutler and the beginnings of a public opening of these lands.

    Memories of Forest Memories.
    Lowered visibilities in the woodland: Some Landscapes and Katsutoshi Yuasa.
    Nostalgia Forest / Oyster Catcher Press.

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-A Year In The Country 2

    Forest Memory-Exhibition-Time The Deer-Amy Cutler-A Year In The Country 6A selection of the many other associated wanderers: Alec FinlayPeter Larkinherman de vriesJeff HilsonColin SackettGerry LooseJustin HopperCarol WattsCamilla NelsonAnthony Barnett,Edmund HardyUna Hamilton HelleKatsutoshi YuasaRichard SkeltonAutumn Richardson,Julian KonczakBryan Nash GillAmy CutlerTom NoonanChris DruryPaul van Dijk,Frances HatherleyJames AldridgeChris Paul DanielsFrances PresleyStefka MuellerGail RitchieChristina WhitePaul Gough, Morven GregorPerdita PhillipsAmy TodmanPeter Jaeger, Zoe HopeZoë SkouldingPeter FoolenPhil Smith /  MythogeographyCees de BoerCarlea Holl-JensenTony LopezWill MontgomeryMichael HamptonKate MorrellBen BorekNatalia JanotaJohn WebbSung Hee JinMartin BridgeNicholas BranchMike BaillieMark Nesbitt.

    A flickering dash of specimens.

    The original outcrop I stumbled upon.

     

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  • Day #225/365: A return to the returning footsteps of a Berberian Straw Bear and companions

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-A Year In The CountryFile under: Trails and Influences: Recent Explorations. Case #27/52.

    Not so long ago I went for a wander in the footsteps of By Our Selves (see Day #221/365) and had something of a curiousity piqued visual gander at Andrew Kotting, Iain Sinclair and Toby Jones filmic journey, which follows in the footsteps of the troubled poet John Clare and heads off to meet Mr Alan Moore (who apparently went to school next to where Mr Clare was incarcerated; see more on such things below)…

    …during and since then I’ve had some more of a wander around this project and wanted to return to it to peruse some more of the associated imagery…

    …in particular the Straw Bear figure. As English folkloric characters go, I find this one of the most intriguing. I think in part it reminds me of Charles Fréger’s photographs of European folklore figures, Wilder Mann (see Day #69/365); it has a similar surreal uncanniness and so when investigating its origins, history and story, I wasn’t surprised to see that it is a character which also appears in European folklore.

    Anyway, below is a Bakers Dozen of Berberian Straw Bears, companions and one owl-ic interloper…

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-11

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-10 Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-9
    (Above: shades of Electric Eden’s cover…)

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-7
    (Above: such Wickerman-esque masks seem to be a somewhat frequent signifier of a certain kind of otherly folklore, its tales and atmosphere. See also pathways from and via Sproatly Smith around these parts here, here and elsewhere here.)

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-5 Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-4
    (…amongst the towns and town folk…)

    (Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-16

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-3
    (The above photograph reminds me of The Eccentronic Research Council for some reason…)

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-16b
    (Amongst the corn rigs and barley rigs… I expect it’s actually wheat but I couldn’t say for sure, the not knowing of which may well in part be a side effect of not all that long ago nearly half the population on this particular island worked in agriculture, a figure which apparently now barely wanders into single figures per hundred of us good folk…)

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-2 Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-18

    Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-6Straw Bear-By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Iain Sinclair-Toby Jones-Alan Moore-John Clare-A Year In The Country-14

    (Above right: The interloper.)

    What’s this (once was a Berberian) Straw Bear journey and film all about you may ask? Who was this John Clare chap whose footsteps it is following in?

    Well, a wander round the ether may well tell you more. I’m wary of writing in-depth about another’s troubles but I would point the interested reader in the direction of a somewhat masterful, lyrical exposition on Mr Clare, his journey, life, work, class position/change/conflict and “sharp eye for detail in the wood, the trees, the bark” by Mr Alan Moore.

    That can be visited here and in the ether here (page 98 to be precise, though you will need to delve into the old pennies a touch, though if you do you may also then be able to peruse about Mr Alasdair Roberts via the writing of Mr Rob Young and well, a fair bit more).

    A Straw Bear went a-wandering; By Our Selves in the ether here and here (where you may well also discover the history of why this particular character is being lead along).

    Straw Bear records and documentation: on these shores / on other shores.

     

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  • Day #224/365: Artifact #32/52; Grey Frequency Immersion album – Night/Day editions

    Grey Frequency Immersion album. Night Edition £25.00.  Day edition £18.00.

    Audiological Research and Pathways; Case #1
    Audiological contents: 01 Hemlock Stone (19:01). 02 Coastline, Black Sky (16:41).

    Available at our Artifacts Shop, our Discogs Audiological Archive and our Other Artifacts Etsy shop.
    Prices include free UK shipping. Normally ships within 7-14 days.

     

    Night Edition: Limited to 52 copies. £25.00.

    Box-set contains: album on all black CD-R, string bound booklet, 4x25mm badge set, unique one off art print.

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-2

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-1

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-3

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-9

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-10

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-5

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-6 twin

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-7-print front and back

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-one off prints-A Year In The Country
    (Above: a selection of the 52 one-off prints.)

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-8 badge pack

    Night Edition Details:

    1) All artwork printed using archival Giclée pigment ink.

    2) Contained in a matchbox style sliding two-part rigid matt card box.

    3) Printed box cover print.

    4) Fully black CD-R (black on top, black on playable side).

    5) Black string bound 12.8cm x 12.8cm booklet:
    a) Hand signed by Gavin Morrow of Grey Frequency, hand numbered.
    b) Hand bone creased cover.
    c) 12 pages (6 sides printed);
    d) Contains 5 images, one credits page.
    e) Front and rear covers are printed on 310gsm textured fine art cotton rag paper.
    f) Three inner pages are printed on 245gsm paper.
    g) One inner page is printed on semi-transparent 110gsm vellum paper.

    6) 4x25mm/1″ badge set contained in a see-through polythene bag with a folded card header.

    7) One-off art print:
    12.8cm x 12.8 cm, printed on 310gsm textured fine art cotton rag paper.
    Hand signed and numbered by the AYITC Ocular Signals Department.

    Each set contains a different art print, 52 designs throughout the edition.

     

    Day Edition: Limited to 52 copies. £18.00.

    White/black CD-R album in string bound book packaging.

    Grey Frequency-Immersion album-A Year In The Country

    Grey Frequency-Immersion album-A Year In The Country 2b twin

    Grey Frequency-Immersion album-A Year In The Country-5

    Grey Frequency-Immersion album-A Year In The Country-4b twin

    Grey Frequency-Immersion album-A Year In The Country-7b twin

    Day Edition Details:

    1) All artwork printed using archival Giclée pigment ink.

    2) Wrapped in wax sealed, hand stamped black tissue paper.

    3) White/black CD-R (white on top, black on playable side).

    4) Jute string bound 14.4cm x 13.2cm booklet:
    a) Hand signed by Gavin Morrow of Grey Frequency, hand numbered.
    b) Hand bone creased cover.
    c) 12 pages (6 sides printed);
    d) Contains 5 images, one credits page.
    e) Front and rear covers are printed on 310gsm textured fine art cotton rag paper.
    f) Three inner pages are printed on 245gsm paper.
    g) One inner page is printed on semi-transparent 110gsm vellum paper.

    5) CD-R held in protective fleece-lined sleeve.

     

    Artwork/packaging design by AYITC Ocular Signals Department (utilising visual work/source material by Gavin Morrow).

    Prices include free UK shipping. Normally ships within 7-14 days.

    Available at our Artifacts Shop, our Discogs Audiological Archive and our Other Artifacts Etsy shop.

     

    This Audiological Case Study can also be listened to via our Ether Victrola below and is available for futher perusing/purchase at our Bandcamp page.

     

    Below is the video which accompanies the Hemlock Stone track:

    Visit Grey Frequency in the ether here.

    Peruse Grey Frequency at A Year In The Country: Day #192/365.

     

    The full current library of the A Year In The Country Audiological Research and Pathways series:

    Case Study #1: Grey Frequency: Immersion
    Case Study #2: Hand of Stabs: Black-Veined White
    Case Study #3: Michael Tanner: Nine of Swords
    Case Study #4: United Bible Studies: Doineann
    Case Study #5: She Rocola: Burn The Witch / Molly Leigh Of The Mother Town

    Grey Frequency-Immersion-Night Edition-A Year In The Country-2Hand of Stabs-Black-Veined White-Night Edition-boxset-A Year In The CountryMichael Tanner-Nine Of Swords-Night Edition-box set-A Year In The Country

     

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  • Day #223/365: Image M/3

    Image M3-A Year In The Country

    File under:
    A Year In The Country: Work

     

    View more visual work from the A Year In The Country project in the Gallery.

     

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  • Day #222/365: “Here be monsters”: a note on ritual – introductions to and discoveries of Summer Isles predecessors via Ritual, Old Crow and the work of an archivist, literary sometimes pop-star

    Ritual-David Pinner-Finders Keepers Records-Bob Stanley-A Year In The CountryFile under: Trails and Influences. Other Pathways. Case #36/52.

    A piece of writing that I have returned to a fair number of times on the way and leading up to this year in the country is Bob Stanley’s introduction to the reprint of David Pinner’s Ritual.

    Ritual is the book that was in part the inspiration for what became The Wickerman… it’s story of a puritanical policeman outsider coming to investigate a murder, references to the old ways and associated rituals can be quite easily linked forward to what became it’s now much more well-known celluloid semi-offspring.

    For years the book remained obscure, out of print and fetched rather large sums of money but it was relatively recently re-released by Finders Keepers Records, which includes the aforementioned introduction, A Note On Ritual.

    I’m not quite sure why the introduction has intrigued me so and has caused me to return to and delve through it on repeated occasions.

    In part it is maybe because it’s one of those times where the introduction makes me not sure if I want/need to read the whole book.

    The introduction opens with a sense of how nature can come to almost dwarf you, how our sense of urban/modern security can easily be dismissed by the ways and whiles of nature (cue visions of the alone-ness, at the mercy of powers, forces and whims far removed from on/off switches, taps and swooshes that wandering through such landscapes can sometimes bring about).

    It seems to capture and conjure up the stories and atmosphere of the novel, to summon up a sense of the potential wildness of rural life/ways and to almost exist as a thing unto itself, separate from the following pages; it is an overview of/background to a very particular, small slice of literature which dealt with and in pastoral otherlyness.

    Shena Mackay-Old Crow-book-A Year In The CountryAlso, it was this introduction which lead me to that other tale of village flipsides, Shena Mackays Old Crow. Though not a particularly rare book, the available copies of the version where the artwork does the story and its subject justice seem comparatively few and far between. The image to the left is one of those particular copies. A lovely, if unsettling silhouette.

    Mr Bob Stanley seems to have a good eye and ear for collecting/commenting/dispensing musical work, whether it be Keeler-esque gatherings of songs for soho shenanigans, collections of swinging sixties beat gal combos, aural collations of music for a good old cup of tea and symphony or sending early missives for that great semi-lost English lost pub afternoon, British Rail ralliers Earl Brutus out into the world.

    Along such lines, his Gather In The Mushrooms compilation of late 1960s/early-mid 1970s acid/psych/underground folk I think is still one of the finest, well, gatherings of such things that I have come across and indeed was one of the sparks in the undergrowth that became this particular conflagration of words and culture that is A Year In The Country. Well worth seeking out indeed.

    Read the introduction here (where it can also be purchased) or have a look-see/background read here.

    0001-A Year In The Country-Gather In The MushroomsGather In The Mushrooms here.

    Mr Stanley’s wanderings through mid-century minxes and other (not always popular/populist) popular music findings here.

     

     

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  • Day #221/365: A Straw Bear went a-wandering; a once Berberian sound engineer follows past footsteps, other boot filling and less than but two penn’orth worth on a roll of music

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The CountryBy Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-1
    File under: Trails and Influences: Recent Explorations. Case #26/52.

    I seem to have a curious ability to come across a certain kind of time-limited electronic ether funding appeal to the general public for creative projects (or crowd funding, to use the modern terminology) just after they’ve ended…

    By Our Selves was one of those, a film by Andrew Kotting and Iain Sinclair (who formerly collaborated on another filmic journey which involved waterways, a pedal driven swan-boat and journeys to the once games of the gods)…

    …at which point I step onto another interconnected pathway for a moment or two…

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-2

    I might be wrong but I expect the period we’re currently living in will be looked back upon as a time of transition as concerns the way that creative projects are funded and their creators try to keep the cupboards, if not full, at least not heading towards empty. Such forms of funding as the one used in this instance are a useful tool but also possibly one of the signs of a system that is out of balance, as the machinery/systems associated with the transmission and replication of such work has changed but the associated forms of cupboard filling have not kept pace.

    This has lead to a patchwork of ways of going about such things, none of which quite address the central issue that in the current system there is access to culture via cheap (if sometimes unlicensed) forms through this new machinery but at the same time there has been a lack of building equitable, viable structures to pay for the actual core of things; the story contained in the film, album etc.

    (I say cheap rather than free and mention equitable as pockets are routinely delved into/it is expected that they will be for transmission systems and machinery.)

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-3

    Advance funding appeals to an audience/the general or niche public aren’t necessarily a new idea (I first came across a similar payment in advance funding system for an album a fair few spins round the sun ago and the longstanding cultural institution of Einstürzende Neubauten used a similar idea a while or so ago – as documented by Ms Danielle de Picciotto) it’s just that the technology has changed and now allows for such things to be carried out more easily…

    …though ironically, in part the technology that has required the use of such systems by changing/making nolonger as viable previous models of funding, is the same as that which such systems use: the world has become heavily populated with easily accessible digital copying machines and transmission systems, which both giveth and taketh away. Or to semi-quote Mr Luke Haines, the old saying which used to be pram in the hall, art out the door has become electronic ether in the corner, art out the door…

    …well, at least as applies in part to people being paid for/funding their creative work.

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-6

    It would seem that the providers of said digital copying machines and their associated transmission systems/forums are filling their boots as it were, while curiously managing to avoid paying up very much at all for all the cultural input their systems receive and are made appealing and useful by (see Day #218/365 for more on such things)

    Accompanying which, there is a curious contemporary and historical avoidance by institutional governing bodies in properly dealing with all this at anything like a quick-step pace (at this point I should probably say that this is not a call for draconian stamping out of particular kinds of behaviour, even if that was especially likely/practical/wished for; see putting genies back in the bottle in but a moment).

    Once upon a time music could be replicated in an unlicensed manner via the whirring of ferrous reels and magnets – what was such technology for? All those millions upon millions of such things and their apparatus possibly weren’t for sending audio letter messages to aunties in far-flung climes or making “backup” copies of music you’d bought.

    Although apart from the occasional largely ineffective complaint, slogan and rather fine logo, they were accepted as a legitimate part of business practise/personal use (though there was a nominal levy applied on them, which was intended for but I expect didn’t arrive at the doors of, creative working folk). Their zero and ones replacements, despite occasional equally ineffective hand-wringing calls to arms, seem thus far to have slipped through some kind of similar legislative/cultural/societal loophole but without any even nominal attempt at balancing things out.

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-8

    This is also not a new story but part of an ongoing, seesawing, to-ing and fro-ing

    If you look back at one of the earliest examples of when song-smithery/creative work was represented and replicated via zeros and ones, pianolas (mechanical pianos that played music recorded on hole-punched rolls of paper), you can see that initially there was little or no recompense to those who created the music. So the ruling bodies of the day imposed a levy on each roll produced that was meant to alleviate this problem and, in intention at least, meant to recompense those who created the culture which made the systems/machinery work and worthwhile.

    Isn’t this part of what ruling bodies are meant to do? Mediate when systems go out of kilter/become unbalanced.

    To quote a Mr Nika Aldrich:

    Technology is continuing to expand the number and quality of copies people can make, and when it gets to the point that it limits the incentive to create, Congress steps in and adjusts the balance. As they do that, it shifts the balance intellectual property laws are always trying to strike between incentives to create new content and the ability to use existing content in new ways.

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-15

    It’s pretty hard to put the genie back in the bottle, even if that should be something that the majority of people would like (which it is not I expect in this case) but you can maybe check that the benefits of the granted wishes are dealt with and passed out in an equitable manner.

    (As an aside and loosely connected, the introduction of safety, pollution, working, health etc regulations/provisions/statutes after the earlier untrammelled developments of the industrial revolution in the UK meant that the population – ie those who worked in the aforementioned industries – was not all that fit to be just that, a working population. It wasn’t purely motivated via altruism – it’s hard to be a grasping capitalist when you’re drinking water polluted by your own output and your workers are too sick/injured/disgruntled to work. So governing bodies stepped in to mediate and re-balance the system, which actually meant a generally overall smoother working system for most concerned. A little common sense can hopefully go a long way.)

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-4

    This page isn’t meant to be all doom and gloom mind nor is it a call for stasis or reversal. Rather it is some kind of consideration of ways in which cupboard filling can be undertaken when dreaming, story telling and pondering amongst new systems (that as said earlier, giveth and taketh) takes places. Cupboard filling that doesn’t have to hope for/is overly predicated towards the luck of a private income, the knack for grant form filling or finding a good wind of charity courtesy of its audience etc.

    To roughly semi-quote myself quoting William Gibson, culture is a place where society goes to dream and so plumping up the pillows and providing a decent bed for such repose might not go amiss.

    The wandering of this particular tale of footstep following is one of such routes through the currently somewhat uncleared pathways and one of the ways in which stories find a way… and so back onto that path…

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-9

    So with all the above out of the way (or at least brushed to one side for the moment), By Our Selves looks like a rather fine and intriguing project and something I’m particularly looking forward to seeing once it is completed and sent out into the world.

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-10

    It’s basically a film of a once Berberian sound engineer (Mr Toby Jones and also his father as his own ghost) retracing the steps of troubled poet John Clare from Epping Forest to Northamptonshire, accompanied at points by the earlier mentioned renowned scribe and wanderer (Mr Iain Sinclair) and will at its destination meet up with another renowned scribe and possible magus (Mr Alan Moore) to consider said steps.

    Oh and as a companion on the journey, the wanderers will be accompanied by the folkloric character of a straw bear.

    What more do I need to say? I expect that’s curiosity around these parts thoroughly piqued…

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-11

    View the (now gone) appeal for journeys By Our Selves here. View some associated visual appeal-ery here and here.

    Mr Andrew Kotting, the man underneath the mask indeed, here.

    Another journey by some similar personages (teasingly not-available here).

    Other pathways amongst A Year In The Country:
    Other considerations of art out the door, unbalanced boot filling and connections to/tales by Mr Alan Moore of Northamptonshire.
    Mr Luke Haines.
    Other dried pasture ursidaes (and another).
    Other dream awakenings and enclosures.

    By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-16By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-18By Our Selves-Andrew Kotting-Ian Sinclair-Toby Jones-A Year In The Country-20

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  • Day #220/365: Image L/3

    Image L3-A Year In The Country
    File under:
    A Year In The Country: Work

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  • Day #219/365: Image K/3

    Image K3-A Year In The Country
    File under:
    A Year In The Country: Work

    View more visual work from the A Year In The Country project in the Gallery.

     

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  • Day #218/365: A wander around Red Shift, layers of history, the miasma/amber of cultural replications and associated reinterpretations/utilitarianisms

    Play-For-Today-1200-Red Shift-Alan Garner-BFI-BBC-A-Year-In-The-Country-smaller
    Trails and Influences: Electronic Ether. Case #29/52.

    There’s a literary/intellectual/cultural idea that similar/interconnected things continue to happen in the same places over time, almost as though places become nodes or echo chambers for particular occurences or a kind of temporal layering occurs…

    …this is something which connects with the sense of layers of stories and hidden histories (real or culturally imagined) that seems to be something a recurring theme/idea on the way up to and during this year in the country; a fascination with the pattern beneath or under the plough (see more of such things in its literary origin here, musical antecedents here and place as historically layered recording device at Day #23/365).

    …which brings me to Red Shift, based on a book by Alan Garner, with a screenplay written/collaborated on by him (and the book first appeared in 1973… it’s that year again…).

    Almost ten years after The Owl Service, Mr Garner’s stories were sent out into the land via the cathode rays and waves of the national broadcasting/receiving system.

    Pendas Fen-David Rudkin-A Year In The CountryRed Shift is a piece of work which shares some similarities with Penda’s Fen (see Day #191/365) a visionary take on the landscape, its older forms of worship, stories and histories, tales of coming of age, a priggish not always likeable teenage protagonist.

    In it three stories set in different time periods but similar locales interweave and loosely interconnect; Roman/indigenous conflict, the English civil war loyalties/conflict (another field in England?) and modern-day teenage trials and tribulations.

    When wandering through the fields of information on the work of Mr Garner, I was struck by how he works within what could be loosely described as mythological fantasy but is often concerned with stories set in and which spring forth from the land in which he lives.

    Red Shift-Alan Garner-1978-BBC-Play For Today-A Year In The Country-2 darkerIn these internationally concerned times, that’s an intriguing and interesting narrowing for fantastical work, one which reminded me of that other weaver of yarns and sometimes wander through myths, Alan Moore and his Voice Of The Fire; a fictional work which also grounds itself in one specific locale over different millenia and considers links between different lives and histories over time (thanks to this gent for the awakening of memories of that particular – by me at least – semi-forgotten cultural artifact).

    Until recently and in common with much of such things from that era Red Shift was only intermittently, if at all, available through non prescribed channels, not so much lost as frozen in the digital amber of blurred copies of copies of copies from (I assume) its original sending out amongst the airwaves.

    Play For Today-BBC-A Year In The Country-smaller

    Slowly though such things are wandering out from under their lock and key and along with The Changes it will be making a first more legitimate appearance in (I also assume) brushed and scrubbed form via shiny silver discs, accompanying a small selection of such things that includes Robin Redbreast and The Changes, sent forth from one nominally non-commercial cultural institution and then in time another.

    (As an aside and talking of stories travelling through time and place: the routes and riles of copyright are an interesting invention/gossamer. Take Red Shift as a case study: essentially public money pays for something via a geographically specific publicly funded cultural institution, said public is then allowed to see it maybe once or twice in a very temporary time and place located manner… it is kept under lock and key but then there is change in technological availability and access, the gateways for content input to the broadcasting systems go from a handful to almost open-ended and this particular Play For Today escapes in a roundabout way onto a generally transnational modern-day public viewing forum via – I assume – an individual acting as a not-strictly-allowed, unpaid but willing cultural disseminator and replicator… said public forum is an international commercial entity which makes money from often unlicensed or paid-a-pittance for content through accompanying advertising while managing to maintain a straight face when pronouncing its “we’re all above-board, legal and what can we do about it all anyway” spiel… that particular viewing is then blocked by the essentially publicly owned geographically specific corporation that commissioned the item in the first place… who then license it to another geographically specific public cultural institution… and then the geographically specific public who originally paid for the production of said piece of culture are asked to pay to watch that which they essentially own once again… but once they have re-paid any attempts by them to disseminate it – without any personal recompense for work done – via any other channels or to other geographic locations are somewhat frowned upon… are you following at the back? It is probably not a great surprise that a system which was built during and based upon previous modes of transmission and replication – ones which were more easily controlled through lack of access to the necessary technology due to restrictions caused by cost/the requirement of a particular kind of large-scale infrastructure and which had a very limited number of gateways for content input – isn’t one which is operating in the greatest of health in days when the world abounds with – to roughly paraphrase Cory Doctorow – personal access to what are essentially digital copying machines and their associated wired and not-so-wired carrier pigeon system of cables and waves… oh and all this is before we even get to those who create the cultural content – as opposed to those who supply and maintain the associated copying machines, cables/wave/public forum transmission systems, all of which would be much less attractive as being worthy of handing over hard earned currency by the general public without said content – being suitably recompensed for their work. At this point a pause for breath may be required…)

    One thing I find interesting about such things as the finally arriving legitimate release of Red Shift and its companions is the way that the associated covers present the work in a form that concurs with modern sensibilities and/or in a rather utilitarian manner.

    Redshift-Robin Redbreast-The Changes-BBC-BFI-DVD-A Year In The Country

    I expect that posters etc didn’t exist/weren’t necessarily created for such things back when, so they wouldn’t be available for use but I think it would be interesting to see them packaged and presented in a manner that reflected their own aesthetic and time of creation. Not necessarily in a harking back to the past/retro manner, more in a way that captured the spirit of their original era (though contrarily having said which, I quite like the above covers and the way that cover illustrations/designs change for cultural artifacts over time and can reflect the age in which they appear; see Day #173/365)…

    Mow Cop-David Byrne-Red Shift-Alan Garner-A Year In The Country

    …and in some kind of segue back to Red Shift, cultural replication and the contrasts between items of practical/decorative use, I like the way that the castle featured in the Red Shift story/its cover was built to resemble an older ruin. A folly? Possibly but a somewhat grand one.

    Beasts-Nigel Kneale-Children Of The Stones-Sky-Raven-The Owl Service-Alan Garner-A Year In The Country

    Utilitarian-definition-A Year In The Country

    And still no legitimate wash and brush up of Pendas Fen?

    Hmmm.

    Red Shift-Alan Garner-1978-BBC-Play For Today-A Year In The Country-smaller

    Original (non-cover) photograph of the folly by this gent.

     

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  • Day #217/365: Artifact #31/52: Nocturnal Wanderings and Light Catchings #2 archival print

    Nocturnal Wanderings and Light Catchings #2 archival print. £5.00.
    Artifact 31-print-A Year In The Country
    Artifact 31-stamp 2-A Year In The Country Artifact 31-numbering-A Year In The Country Artifact 31-signature-A Year In The Country

    Limited edition of 52. Each print is signed and numbered.

    Handstamped on the reverse.
    Size: A6; 14.85 x 10.5 cm / 5.8 x 4.1″.

    Printed with archival Giclée pigment inks on fine art 310gsm textured 100% cotton rag paper.

    Free UK shipping.

    Available at our Artifacts Shop and in our Etsy shop.

     

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